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Volume 3 – Full volume is now available!

We here at The Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org, Inc. are pleased to announce our latest full volume publication. Volume 3 continues our tradition of publishing important peer reviewed research on the archeology and history of the Texas Borderlands region. Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Todd Ahlman and Publisher Steve Davis invite you to download the complete volume.

Download the Complete JTAH Volume 3

For those needing a printed version, we will soon have hard copies available through CreateSpace.com (an Amazon company).

Important Notes about the full volume 3:

  1. The full volume file is 86 MB in size. Your download time will take a minute or two if you have a slow ISP.
  2. The file contains 3-D interactive and video animation imagery that may not work on your computer unless you have a recent version of Adobe Reader or one of the Adobe software packages; such as Acrobat or Illustrator.
  3. Adobe provides a free download of their Reader DC software at this link: Adobe Reader DC.

MILITARY DIET ON THE BORDER: BUTCHERY ANALYSIS AT FORT BROWN (41CF96) CAMERON COUNTY, Texas

Volume 3, Article 4

MILITARY DIET ON THE BORDER: BUTCHERY ANALYSIS AT FORT BROWN (41CF96) CAMERON COUNTY, Texas

Crystal A. Dozier
Department of Anthropology
Texas A&M University

Abstract

Archaeological investigations at Fort Brown (41CF96) have provided a wealth of information about military life in south Texas. This re-analysis of the faunal material recovered by the Archaeological Research Laboratory’s survey efforts in 1988 investigates butchering patterns found at the site. While evidence for modern European American cuts are present, processing of beef os coxae and sacrum are inconsistent with current European American butchery practices. The assemblage is dominated by inexpensive cuts of meat that would have allowed for easy cooking within stews or soups. The butchery patterns seen at Fort Brown are compared to early twentieth century military standards as well as local, and particularly Mexican, influences on Fort Brown foodways.

Link to full article.

THEORIES ON THE BLUE WING ROAD BURIAL (41BX34) IN THE CONTEXT OF THE GUTIÉRREZ-MAGEE EXPEDITION

Volume 3, Article 3

THEORIES ON THE BLUE WING ROAD BURIAL (41BX34) IN THE CONTEXT OF THE GUTIÉRREZ-MAGEE EXPEDITION

Brandon K. Richards, Energy Renewal Partners

ABSTRACT

In 1968, the skeletal remains of an individual believed to have been involved in the Gutiérrez-Magee expedition of 1812-1813 were exhumed south of San Antonio. Since then, the circumstances surrounding what became known as the “Blue Wing Road burial” have remained somewhat of a mystery. This article introduces a new theory that posits that the burial is not directly related to the major battles fought in the region (the Battles of Rosalis and Medina), but more likely an incident involving a Republican detachment encountering Royalists stationed along a well-travelled route.

Link to full article.

AN UNUSUAL LATE ABORIGINAL ASSEMBLAGE SAN SABA COUNTY, CENTRAL TEXAS FROM THE WILSON SITE (41SS186), SAN SABA COUNTY, CENTRAL TEXAS

Volume 3, Article 2

AN UNUSUAL LATE ABORIGINAL ASSEMBLAGE  SAN SABA COUNTY, CENTRAL TEXAS  FROM THE WILSON SITE (41SS186), SAN SABA COUNTY, CENTRAL TEXAS

Charles A. Hixson
with a contribution by James K. Feathers

ABSTRACT

The late aboriginal component in the Wilson Site in San Saba County is unusual in that most of the assemblage is consistent with that of Classic Toyah, but the diagnostic projectile point is an unnotched triangular arrow point instead of the typical Perdiz point. The absence of Perdiz points suggests that this component is associated with non-Toyah people and possibly dates to after 1700. Archaeological testing by the Llano Uplift Archeological Society (LUAS) to find supporting evidence for a historic date identified an Austin phase shell midden and a “Late Component” composed of triangular arrow points, end scrapers, a beveled biface and bone-tempered sherds, but no items of European manufacture. Complicating matters, the luminescence dating on a ceramic sample opens the possibility that the Late Component predates the currently accepted beginning of the Toyah phase.

Link to full article.

ARCHEOLOGICAL 3D MAPPING: THE STRUCTURE FROM MOTION REVOLUTION

Volume 3, Article 1

ARCHEOLOGICAL 3D MAPPING: THE STRUCTURE FROM MOTION REVOLUTION

Mark D. Willis1, Charles W. Koenig2*, Stephen L. Black2, and Amanda M. Castañeda2

ABSTRACT

Mapping is a critical aspect of systematic documentation no matter where archaeologists work. From hand-drawn maps of excavation units to maps created with Total Data Stations or LiDAR scanning, today’s archaeologists have a suite of mapping techniques and technologies to choose from when documenting a site. Typically, spectacular sites often receive high resolution mapping, whereas everyday sites rarely do. Recently, however, a revolutionary technology and technique has been created that can produce highly accurate and precise three-dimensional maps and orthophotos of archaeological sites, features, and profiles at a fraction of the cost and time of LiDAR and intensive TDS mapping: Structure from Motion (SfM). SfM is a new digital photography processing technique for capturing highly detailed, three-dimensional (3D) data from almost any surface using digital cameras. This article introduces the various platforms SfM photographs can be collected from (UAV, kites, balloons, poles, and groundbased) and provides examples of different types of data SfM can provide. The Structure from Motion Revolution is unfolding across the globe at a rapid pace, and we encourage archaeologists to take advantage of this new recording method.

Link to full article.

Important Notes about Article 1:

  1. The Article 1 file is 83.7 MB in size. Your download time will take a minute or two if you have a slow ISP.
  2. The file contains 3-D interactive and video animation imagery that may not work on your computer unless you have a recent version of Adobe Reader or one of the Adobe software packages; such as Acrobat or Illustrator.
  3. Adobe provides a free download of their Reader DC software at this link: Adobe Reader DC.

JTAH VOLUME THREE HAS LAUNCHED!

Greetings! The Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org is extremely pleased to announce the first article in our third volume of peer-reviewed research of archeology and history in the Texas Borderlands has been published online at our website. The article, authored by Mark Willis, Charles Koenig, Steve Black and Amanda Castaneda, is a beautifully illustrated and detailed description of the revolutionary new site recording methodology developed by the authors that is based on SfM photography.

This article demonstrates the power of digital publishing with interactive 3-D imagery, video animation clips and high-resolution photography to explain their use of technology to create a new system of site documentation. Our future authors are encouraged to include extensive high resolution imagery, sound bites, video clips, as well as 3-D interactive images like those found in this new article.

Please follow this link to read or download the new article: (Volume 3, Article 1)

Important Notes about Article 1:

  1. The Article 1 file is 83.7 MB in size. Your download time will take a minute or two if you have a slow ISP.
  2. The file contains 3-D interactive and video animation imagery that may not work on your computer unless you have a recent version of Adobe Reader or one of the Adobe software packages; such as Acrobat or Illustrator.
  3. Adobe provides a free download of their Reader DC software at this link: Adobe Reader DC.

 

Call for Papers – Volume 3

Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org has been established to protect, preserve and promote archeology and history through public outreach, publishing, and distribution. Our signature work is a peer-reviewed publication that promotes professional and scholastic level research in the fields of archeology and history regarding a geographic region centered around the State of Texas that includes Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and the northern portions of Mexico. We call this region the “Texas Borderlands”.

The JTAH journal is an open-access online publication whose text is discoverable via Google Scholar and other prominent search engines. It is freely available to authors and readers worldwide. It is word searchable in common .PDF file format and indexed to be discoverable on the internet. We have no deadline for authors to meet; simply submit the completed manuscript to Editor-in-Chief Todd M. Ahlman at t_a57@txstate.edu and he will begin the peer review process. All submissions should follow American Antiquity style:

(http://www.saa.org/Portals/0/SAA/Publications/StyleGuide/StyleGuide_Final_813.pdf).

Upon peer review and approval by our Editor-in-Chief and final preparation for publication, it will be published in the online journal. Volumes close on December 31 and the next volume is begun on January 01.

Because the Journal is a 100% digital publication, authors may take full advantage of technology to enhance their article through use of features not available in traditional publications. These enhancements include: extensive color, high-resolution photography, video clips and embedded sound bites, 3-D interactive renderings, and hypertext links to outside content and websites.

Volume 2 now available in print edition.

We are pleased to announce the complete JTAH Volume 2 is now available in print on Amazon.comCreateSpace.com, and KindleDirectPublishing for the modest price of $18.36. At these websites, simply search “Journal of Texas Archeology and History” or “ISBN: 978-1530329342”.

These paperbacks are produced as a high-quality, full color publication with our new cover design featuring Forrest Kirkland rock art watercolor renderings and contain outstanding articles of peer reviewed research concerning archeology and history of the “Texas Borderlands” region.

This new paperback print edition accommodates those who require or prefer printed copies while the “Journal” remains freely available online for reading or to download and print on your printer or any other “print-on-demand” service at https://jtah.org/2016/02/27/volume-2-2015-publication-announcement/.

2015 T.A.S. BOOK FESTIVAL – AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT

Saturday, October 24th @ 4:00 PM – 4:50 PM                                       MYRIAM ARCANGELI                                                                                    Omni Westside Hotel, Houston Texas (open to the public)

“Sherds of History: Domestic Life in Colonial Guadeloupe”

Myriam Arcangeli

Book10pic1Ceramics serve as one of the best-known artifacts excavated by archaeologists. They are carefully described, classified, and dated, but rarely do scholars consider their many and varied uses. Breaking from this convention, Myriam Arcangeli examines potsherds from four colonial sites in the Antillean island of Guadeloupe to discover what these everyday items tell us about the people who used them. In the process, she reveals a wealth of information about the lives of the elite planters, the middle and lower classes, and enslaved Africans.

By analyzing how the people of Guadeloupe used ceramics–whether jugs for transporting and purifying water, pots for cooking, or pearlware for eating–Arcangeli spotlights the larger social history of Creole life. What emerges is a detail rich picture of water consumption habits, changing foodways, and concepts of health. Sherds of History offers a compelling and novel study of the material record and the “ceramic culture” it represents to broaden our understanding of race, class, and gender in French-colonial societies in the Caribbean and the United States.

Arcangeli’s innovative interpretation of the material record will challenge the ways archaeologists analyze ceramics.

Book10pic2Myriam Arcangeli recently earned her doctorate in historical archaeology from Boston University. Her research on colonial-era ceramics in Guadeloupe–the basis for this book–explored the history of Creole culture and proposed a novel and original approach for analyzing and interpreting ceramics. Myriam has been interested in ceramics since the beginning of her career, and her first research projects examined the history of local potteries near Toulouse, in southwestern France. Intrigued by the colonial period, she then left for the United States, where she discovered American archaeology while excavating at Mount Vernon, the plantation home of George Washington. Currently, she is working on publishing her research in both French and English journals, and contributed to the forthcoming The Archaeology of Food: An Encyclopedia, edited by Mary C. Beaudry and Karen B. Metheny.

Publisher: University Press of Florida, 2/3/2015, ISBN: 978-0-8130-6042-2
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