Tag Archives: Volume 1 2014

Complete Vol 1 (2014)

Complete Volume 1 – 2014 .pdf

Front Matter for Volume 1 – 2014 (Publishers Note: the “Front Matters” contain the front cover, inside cover, table of contents, forward from publisher and list of authors.)

 

FOREWORD TO VOLUME 1 (2014): PUBLISHER’S REFLECTIONS

Every journey begins with a first step. The seed thought for this Journal germinated during lunch at the Bob Bullock State History Museum barely a year ago. From that late November discussion with Tim Perttula, we have traveled much farther and faster than ever imagined. The rough concept we outlined that day has grown and matured rapidly. Today, we are putting the polishing touches on the premier volume and readying it for publication.

As I pen these thoughts, it is a time to give thanks and reflect on one’s blessings for the year past. The Journal of Texas Archeology and History could not have been possible without the generous participation of many individuals who believe in our mission and purpose. Chief among these is our editor-in-chief, Tim Perttula, who has invested a great deal of his time to ensure the quality and accuracy of the Journal’s content. Supporting Tim is our outstanding editorial board, Steve Black, Chris Lintz, Robert Z. Selden Jr., Frank de la Teja, Juliana Barr, and Todd Smith. These individuals have provided expert editorial review services to make sure the peer review process has been solid and seamless. Several subject matter experts also stepped up to add their expertise to the review process. It is important to note for posterity that everyone involved with this effort contributed freely and cheerfully their time and efforts to support this publication, indicating their commitment and enthusiasm to the goals of this Journal: free, open access to digital publication of archeological and historical research of the region.

Ranking highest on my list on this day of thanksgiving are the authors who trusted us with the fruits of their labor at an untested, unproven new publication. Researchers and writers pour their blood, sweat, and tears into their works. It is no small thing that they entrusted us with its safekeeping. So, to the 11 courageous authors of Volume 1, I salute you!

Finally, looking toward the future, we have already begun to assemble content for Volume 2. Based on early indications, we will build on the success and quality of the premier volume in size, breadth of coverage and concept of content. Beyond that, the Journal of Texas Archeolog y and History has broad plans to publish several “Special Publications” of important themed materials from multiple research groups and may offer Spanish and French versions as well. We hope to strengthen our ties with researchers and writers in the surrounding states and northern Mexico. 2015 will be an interesting and busy year at the Journal of Texas Archeology and History!

Journal of Texas Archeology and History

Steve Davis, Publisher

Thanksgiving Day, 2014

Evidence for a Long-Distance Trade in Bois d’Arc Bows in 16 th Century Texas ( Maclura pomifera , Moraceae)

Volume 1 (2014) – Article 3

Evidence for a Long-Distance Trade in Bois d’Arc Bows in 16 th Century Texas ( Maclura pomifera , Moraceae)

By: Leslie L. Bush

ABSTRACT
A piece of wood charcoal identified as bois d’arc (Maclura pomifera) was recovered from the Janee site (41MN33) in Menard County, Texas. The specimen has been directly dated to 400 ± 30 B.P., a period when no naturally-occurring bois d’arc stands are believed to have been present within 400 miles of the site. Bois d’arc ecology, economic uses of bois d’arc wood, and historical accounts of bois d’arc trade indicate the specimen is best interpreted as part of a trade item related to Caddo bow-making traditions in Northeast Texas and adjacent areas of other states.

POST OF LAMPASAS: FORGOTTEN RECONSTRUCTION ERA U.S. ARMY POST (1867-1870)

Volume 1 (2014) – Article 2

POST OF LAMPASAS: FORGOTTEN RECONSTRUCTION ERA U.S. ARMY POST (1867-1870)

By: Richard S. Jones

ABSTRACT
While it is well known that troops were stationed in and around Lampasas during the Reconstruction era (1865-1877), the existence of an army post in Lampasas County, Texas, has been rediscovered through the recent digitization of army post returns. The post returns, available through the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration and Ancestry.com, indicated that the post operated between 1867 and 1870. These post returns are utilized to highlight significant events that occurred in this area during the Reconstruction era. Circumstantial evidence obtained while conducting this research has identified the actual location of the post within the City of Lampasas.

SHRUB, SCRUB, AND GRASS: THE IMPORTANCE OF SHRUBLAND AND GRASSLAND PLANT COMMUNITIES TO THE DIET OF THE LATE PREHISTORIC (A.D. 900-1535) HUNTER-GATHERERS OF THE EASTERN TRANS-PECOS REGION OF TEXAS

Volume 1 (2014) – Article 1

SHRUB, SCRUB, AND GRASS: THE IMPORTANCE OF SHRUBLAND AND GRASSLAND PLANT COMMUNITIES TO THE DIET OF THE LATE PREHISTORIC (A.D. 900-1535) HUNTER-GATHERERS OF THE EASTERN TRANS-PECOS REGION OF TEXAS

By: Casey W. Riggs

ABSTRACT
The Eastern Trans-Pecos archeological region of Texas is an area rich in botanical diversity, a resource heavily utilized by both prehistoric and historic hunter-gatherers. A comparison of four paleoethnobotanical investigations of archeological sites dating to the Late Prehistoric Era (A.D. 900-1535) with ethnobotanical information of the Mescalero Apache reveal that the botanical component of prehistoric and historic diets have been similar for the past 1,000 years. Differences in the degree of similarity can be attributed to differential preservation and analytical techniques. Further, ecological sites from the Ecological Site Information System are demonstrated as a novel and useful tool for landscape-scale archeological analysis.