ARCHEOLOGICAL 3D MAPPING: THE STRUCTURE FROM MOTION REVOLUTION

Volume 3, Article 1

ARCHEOLOGICAL 3D MAPPING: THE STRUCTURE FROM MOTION REVOLUTION

Mark D. Willis1, Charles W. Koenig2*, Stephen L. Black2, and Amanda M. Castañeda2

ABSTRACT

Mapping is a critical aspect of systematic documentation no matter where archaeologists work. From hand-drawn maps of excavation units to maps created with Total Data Stations or LiDAR scanning, today’s archaeologists have a suite of mapping techniques and technologies to choose from when documenting a site. Typically, spectacular sites often receive high resolution mapping, whereas everyday sites rarely do. Recently, however, a revolutionary technology and technique has been created that can produce highly accurate and precise three-dimensional maps and orthophotos of archaeological sites, features, and profiles at a fraction of the cost and time of LiDAR and intensive TDS mapping: Structure from Motion (SfM). SfM is a new digital photography processing technique for capturing highly detailed, three-dimensional (3D) data from almost any surface using digital cameras. This article introduces the various platforms SfM photographs can be collected from (UAV, kites, balloons, poles, and groundbased) and provides examples of different types of data SfM can provide. The Structure from Motion Revolution is unfolding across the globe at a rapid pace, and we encourage archaeologists to take advantage of this new recording method.

Link to full article.

Important Notes about Article 1:

  1. The Article 1 file is 83.7 MB in size. Your download time will take a minute or two if you have a slow ISP.
  2. The file contains 3-D interactive and video animation imagery that may not work on your computer unless you have a recent version of Adobe Reader or one of the Adobe software packages; such as Acrobat or Illustrator.
  3. Adobe provides a free download of their Reader DC software at this link: Adobe Reader DC.

JTAH VOLUME THREE HAS LAUNCHED!

Greetings! The Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org is extremely pleased to announce the first article in our third volume of peer-reviewed research of archeology and history in the Texas Borderlands has been published online at our website. The article, authored by Mark Willis, Charles Koenig, Steve Black and Amanda Castaneda, is a beautifully illustrated and detailed description of the revolutionary new site recording methodology developed by the authors that is based on SfM photography.

This article demonstrates the power of digital publishing with interactive 3-D imagery, video animation clips and high-resolution photography to explain their use of technology to create a new system of site documentation. Our future authors are encouraged to include extensive high resolution imagery, sound bites, video clips, as well as 3-D interactive images like those found in this new article.

Please follow this link to read or download the new article: (Volume 3, Article 1)

Important Notes about Article 1:

  1. The Article 1 file is 83.7 MB in size. Your download time will take a minute or two if you have a slow ISP.
  2. The file contains 3-D interactive and video animation imagery that may not work on your computer unless you have a recent version of Adobe Reader or one of the Adobe software packages; such as Acrobat or Illustrator.
  3. Adobe provides a free download of their Reader DC software at this link: Adobe Reader DC.

 

Call for Papers – Volume 3

Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org has been established to protect, preserve and promote archeology and history through public outreach, publishing, and distribution. Our signature work is a peer-reviewed publication that promotes professional and scholastic level research in the fields of archeology and history regarding a geographic region centered around the State of Texas that includes Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and the northern portions of Mexico. We call this region the “Texas Borderlands”.

The JTAH journal is an open-access online publication whose text is discoverable via Google Scholar and other prominent search engines. It is freely available to authors and readers worldwide. It is word searchable in common .PDF file format and indexed to be discoverable on the internet. We have no deadline for authors to meet; simply submit the completed manuscript to Editor-in-Chief Todd M. Ahlman at t_a57@txstate.edu and he will begin the peer review process. All submissions should follow American Antiquity style:

(http://www.saa.org/Portals/0/SAA/Publications/StyleGuide/StyleGuide_Final_813.pdf).

Upon peer review and approval by our Editor-in-Chief and final preparation for publication, it will be published in the online journal. Volumes close on December 31 and the next volume is begun on January 01.

Because the Journal is a 100% digital publication, authors may take full advantage of technology to enhance their article through use of features not available in traditional publications. These enhancements include: extensive color, high-resolution photography, video clips and embedded sound bites, 3-D interactive renderings, and hypertext links to outside content and websites.

Volume 2 now available in print edition.

We are pleased to announce the complete JTAH Volume 2 is now available in print on Amazon.comCreateSpace.com, and KindleDirectPublishing for the modest price of $18.36. At these websites, simply search “Journal of Texas Archeology and History” or “ISBN: 978-1530329342”.

These paperbacks are produced as a high-quality, full color publication with our new cover design featuring Forrest Kirkland rock art watercolor renderings and contain outstanding articles of peer reviewed research concerning archeology and history of the “Texas Borderlands” region.

This new paperback print edition accommodates those who require or prefer printed copies while the “Journal” remains freely available online for reading or to download and print on your printer or any other “print-on-demand” service at https://jtah.org/2016/02/27/volume-2-2015-publication-announcement/.

Volume 2 (2015) Publication Announcement

The Journal of Texas Archeology and History.org, Inc. is pleased to announce the publication of our second annual volume of peer reviewed research on archeology and history of the Texas Borderlands region. This volume features outstanding writing on a variety of subjects under our new cover design and formatting comprised of articles published during 2015. Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Todd Ahlman and I invite you to download the complete volume.

Download the Complete JTAH Volume 2 (2015)

Download the Front Matter for JTAH Volume 2 (2015)

For those needing a printed version, we will soon have hard copies available through CreateSpace.com (an Amazon company).

PRESENTATIONS FROM THE TRANS-RIO BRAVO/RIO GRANDE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH COLLABORATION SYMPOSIUM AND PANEL DISCUSSION

Hello Everyone,

Presented here are the presentations from the Trans-Rio Bravo/Rio Grande International Research Collaboration Symposium and Panel held during the 2015 Texas Archeological Society’s 86th Annual meet.

THOMAS R. HESTER – 50 Years Along the Rio Grande: Reflections on a Variety of Archaeological Research Projects on the Border.”

EMILIANO GALLAGA MURRIETA – “Escuela de Antropología e Historia del Norte de México (EAHNM): a Powerful Ally”

VICTORIA L. MUNOZ – “¿Dónde está la frontera?” 

WILLIAM BREEN MURRAY – “Connections: Rock Art Across the River of Two Names”

MARY JO GALINDO – “Con un pie en cada lado: Nuevo Santander Ranching Communities”

MARTIN SALINAS RIVERA – “Archival Resources for Ethnohistorical Studies of northeastern Mexico and Texas”

Introduction to Symposium and Panel Discussion – Trans Rio-Bravo/Rio Grande International Research Collaboration Symposium and Panel Discussion at the T.A.S. 2015 Annual Meetings in Houston Texas, October 23-25, 2015

Enjoy!

PLAINS APACHE TIPIS: RESIDENTIAL AND CEREMONIAL LODGES

Volume 2, Article 5

PLAINS APACHE TIPIS: RESIDENTIAL AND CEREMONIAL LODGES
By: Michelle Stokely
ABSTRACT
For many Americans, tipis symbolize the nomadic Native American culture and lifestyle. This understanding has been so extensively advanced by paintings, advertising, films, and television that tipis have come to be associated with Native American groups in almost all geographical regions. Tipis were, however, an integral part of residential and ceremonial life in the Great Plains where both construction and use were closely tied to indigenous social organization, politics, war, and spirituality. Among the Kiowa and Plains Apache, residents of the Southern Plains, some tipi covers were painted to reflect war deeds or spiritual blessings. This paper examines the construction, decoration, ownership, and destruction of historic Plains Apache tipis, as well as modern uses of the iconic structures.

Copyright 2015. Journal of Texas Archeology and History. All rights reserved. ISSN 2334-1874